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The EU’s NIS2 Directive entered into force in January 2023 and seeks to achieve a high common level of cybersecurity protection across the Union. The Directive must be implemented by Member States by 17 October 2024 and Hungary has been one of the earliest movers, with its first substantive obligations already in effect: covered entities were required to register with the national authorities by 30 June 2024. You can find more information on the Hungarian…

28 January 2023 is Data Protection Day (or Data Privacy Day outside of Europe), which marks the anniversary of the Council of Europe’s Convention 108. To mark Data Protection Day 2023, Baker McKenzie’s Global Data Privacy and Security Team is pleased to present this special edition update of key data protection and privacy developments and trends across the globe, as well summarising future legislative changes, predictions, and enforcement priorities to look out for during 2023.…

As of 17 July 2016, new surveillance and encryption rules embedded in Hungary’s E-Commerce Act will start to apply. The legislative amendments introduce intrusive surveillance rights for Hungarian authorities in relation to online communications.With an unusually broad extraterritorial scope, the new rules will apply to companies that make available to Hungarian private and business users any online or other electronic communication channels, regardless of whether such company is domiciled in Hungary. Companies providing web or…

The Hungarian Data Protection and Freedom of Information Agency (the “DPA”) recently released its 2015 annual report, including enforcement statistics. The report shows a significant increase in the number of cases handled by the DPA again in 2015. This trend is expected to continue in 2016, given the DPA’s stated 2016 enforcement priorities, summarized below. It also shows an immediate interest in national BCR approval requests, which have been possible in Hungary only since 1 October…

On January 12, in the Szabó and Vissy vs. Hungary case, the European Court of Human Rights (“ECHR”) condemned the surveillance of individuals by Hungarian authorities for anti-terrorism purposes. This ruling provides some helpful guidance on the parameters for anti-terrorist surveillance legislation at a time when various countries around the world are revising such legislation.BackgroundThe case concerned the 2011 Hungarian legislation on secret anti-terrorist surveillance operations (“Legislation”). Under the Legislation, a special anti-terrorism task force…