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Brian Hengesbaugh

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Based on preliminary election results, Californians voted to enact the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”), expanding and revising the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”) effective January 1, 2023 with a one-year look-back to January 1, 2022 for some provisions. Companies around the world with business ties to California should start updating vendor contracts and prepare for new requirements under the statute and revised regulations to be issued by a new California Privacy Protection…

Partners Brian Hengesbaugh and Harry Valetk hosted Practising Law Institute’s Global Data Protection Boot Camp 2020. The program – now in its fifth year – brings together individuals charged with formulating their organization’s global privacy compliance strategy. Harry Valetk chaired the 4-hour* program, which has been designed to help privacy practitioners within every organization – legal, compliance, IT security, and audit –obtain practical information and gain insights into key substantive and procedural compliance recommendations in relation…

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has issued an advisory to alert companies about potential sanctions risks when making payments in response to ransomware attacks. The advisory is in response to the demand for ransomware payments during the COVID-19 pandemic as cyber criminals have severely debilitated systems that merchants rely on to continue to conduct business. A Threat to National Security Ransomware is a form of malicious software designed…

In response to the July 16, 2020 Schrems II ruling from the European Court of Justice, the US Department of Commerce has issued a formal “Standard Contractual Clauses” White Paper to help organizations assess whether their transfers offer appropriate data protection in accordance with the ECJ’s ruling outlining the robust limits and safeguards in the United States for government access to data. Government data access safeguards post-Schrems II Following the Schrems II ruling, organizations that…

The Court of Justice of the EU issued its judgment in Data Protection Commissioner v Facebook Ireland Limited, Maximilian Schrems on 16 July 2020. This decision has implications on the wider issue of regulation of international data transfers and, by extension, the tech industry. Our panel of experts, consisting of Lothar Determann, Elisabeth Dehareng and Brian Hengesbaugh, examines the intricacies of the ruling and what it means for the TMT sector. https://open.spotify.com/episode/79SqOrfWy9fICVqHE7myVx

It’s difficult to believe that it has only been a short time since the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated the European Commission adequacy finding for the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield on July 16, 2020. So much has changed. In this final note in the series, we provide seven predictions for the road ahead with “Schrems II” and global data transfers. Some of these may be more controversial than others, but here goes: 1.…

Brian Hengesbaugh is joined by Marcela Robledo, partner in Baker McKenzie’s San Francisco office, to discuss trends in technology transactions. Tune in to hear about: Diligence companies should perform on vendors prior to completing a transactionContractual provisions that can be implemented to mitigate riskTips on negotiating with vendors who aren’t keen to compromise https://open.spotify.com/episode/5OoJ50p39vqOre4DlLsM3J

The Court of Justice of the European Union issued its decision in “Schrems II” Thursday, a landmark decision that invalidates the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield arrangement. Until July 16, Privacy Shield had served as an approved “adequacy” mechanism to protect cross-border transfers of personal data from the European Union to the United States under the EU General Data Protection Regulation. More than 5,000 organizations participate in Privacy Shield. Many thousands more EU companies rely on Privacy…

The European Court of Justice (“ECJ”) issued a landmark ruling earlier today that invalidates the EU – US Privacy Shield Framework (“Privacy Shield”) in Case C-311/18 (“Schrems II”).

Digital assets vary. They can be a virtual currency that has no analog in the real world, and exists only on the blockchain used as a substitute for money. For this reason, virtual currencies are generally considered to be secure and offering a high degree of privacy. A recent decision from a US federal court of appeals, however, may cast a different light on this generally held view. USA v. Gratkowski In United States v.…